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Meet our team- Fletcher

  • 06/11/2015
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  • Admin

Meet Fletcher our translations co-ordinator

 

Hi Fletcher, can you tell us about your background?

After finishing school I attended sixth form for 1 year before moving to another college to study business enterprise, this really spurred my passion for business.

Why did you want to work for Vandu and what made you accept the job?

I attended an apprenticeship open day with the intention of finding one within a successful company. I got speaking to Vandu and as we really hit it off, I got invited for an interview. I loved the friendly intimate atmosphere and everyone made me feel really welcome. I knew this was somewhere where I could grow as a person and Vandu gave me that opportunity.

What is your job role at Vandu?

I am the translations co-ordinator and representative of translations.

What is a translator?

A translator is professionally qualified to translate documents from its original source to another language. They are also qualified to proof read other people’s work. A translation can take many forms such as film subtitles, transcripts and legal documents.

What do you like about your role?

From getting the opportunity to go from being trained to training others and learning through experience is fantastic.  I thoroughly embrace every challenge that presents itself to me and liaising with clients and translators ultimately giving them customer satisfaction is very important to me. Finally coming to work each day knowing you have the support and energy from every member of staff is amazing.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years?

I want to continue to learn through additional training to become an expert in my subject area. One day I would love to start up my own business.

 

If you want to book a translator please email translations@vlslanguages.com or call 01273 473986

 

                                                                                     

 

 

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Around the world, Halloween style!

  • 02/11/2015
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  • Admin

Halloween                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

It has arrived. That one day a year where we can dress up as whatever we like and get away with it, because it’s Halloween and anything goes.

However, it’s not just about the fancy dress, pumpkin carving and the persistent knock of trick or treaters. To get to the roots of this diversely celebrated tradition we are going to have to travel back in time to Ireland 2,000 years ago…

The Celts believed that on the night that marked the end of summer and the beginning of winter, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead blurred allowing ghosts of the dead to return to earth.

Huge sacred bonfires were built to burn crops and animals as sacrifices to their ancient gods. Wearing costumes consisting of animal heads and skins they tried to determine each other's predictions for the long dark winter ahead.

Halloween is also widely celebrated around the world, let’s see how it’s done.

1. Germany

It’s common to hide knives so returning spirits won’t get injured.

2. Austria

Austrians turn on a lamp and leave bread and water for the spirits.

3. Mexico

The famous Dia de los Muertos ‘day of the dead’, is held. The celebration is designed to honour the dead who, it is believed, with the guidance of candles and incense return to their earthly homes on Halloween.

4. Italy

Italian families make bean-shaped caked called ‘beans of the dead’. However in southern Italy, families prepare a feast for the departed relatives, then go to church, leaving their homes open so spirits can feast.
5. China

Teng Chieh is the name for Halloween in China.  Food and water are placed in front of photographs of family members who have departed, while bonfires and lanterns are lit in order to light the paths of the spirits as they travel the earth on Halloween.

6. Czech Republic

Flowers and candles are placed on graves whilst at home, they place a chair for each dead relative by the fireside. Legend has it that the living can speak to the dead, who can hear—and respond.

How did you celebrate this Halloween? Let us know!                               


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vandu Language Services is based in Lewes, Sussex and has been helping organisations overcome the language barrier since 1999. We provide interpreting, translation, bilingual advocacy and cross cultural training for when you need to communicate clearly across cultures.

                                                                                     

 

 

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Meet our team- Alejandra

  • 29/10/2015
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  • Admin

Meet Alejandra our bilingual advocacy co-ordinator

 

Hi Alejandra, can you tell us about your background?

Originally from Spain, I started off working as a bilingual secretary. After 2 years I decided to take the move to Ireland where I lived for 8 years working first in Customer Service and then in HR.

However I moved back to Spain where I became a legal secretary.

Why did you want to work for Vandu and what made you accept the job?

I met Vandu through their interpreting level 3 course that I completed in 2011. After getting to know Mebrak and having a real passion for languages and culture I slowly became a full time member of the team.

What is your job role at Vandu?

As well as being the service supervisor in the office I am in charge of promoting bilingual advocacy.

What is Bilingual advocacy?

The difference between an interpreter and a Bilingual advocate is that an interpreter relays the message without any input, however an advocate is representing the client’s voice, empowering them to do things for themselves. It provides clients with resources such as health and social services, allowing them to be able to fulfil their own needs. Ultimately an advocate provides the long term solution.

What do you like about your role?

Personally I like knowing that my job can have some input in the wellbeing of other people’s lives.

What do you get up to in your spare time?

I have a real passion for arts and crafts and I love painting. I am also a member of a church in London which is really special because we are all from different back grounds and cultures but we all have one thing in common. I love the socialising aspect of it as this is something that helps me grow as a person making an impact in every other area in my life.  

 

If you want to book a bilingual advocate please email admin@vlslanguages.com or call 01273 473986

 

Vandu Language Services is based in Lewes, Sussex and has been helping organisations overcome the language barrier since 1999. We provide interpreting, translation, bilingual advocacy and cross cultural training for when you need to communicate clearly across cultures.

                                                                                     

 

 

 

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Meet our team- Amy

  • 20/10/2015
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  • Admin

Meet Amy our business administration co-ordinator

 

Hi Amy, can you tell us about your background?

I finished school, and then went on to college. After working in my mum’s café for a year I decided I wanted to try a new venture so eventually became a fully qualified nursery nurse. I really enjoyed this but I still wanted more of a challenge.

Why did you want to work for Vandu and what made you accept the job?

I went to City College with the desire to study a business administration apprenticeship and they quickly matched my skills and qualities to Vandu. After my trial I came away with a real buzz for the place after really liking the team and the atmosphere.

What is your job role at Vandu?

I’m in charge of making the bookings for an interpreter, bookings can be either for face to face interpretation or over the telephone. It’s really easy to book an interpreter; it can be done by email, through our website or by phone.

What is an Interpreter?

An interpreter bridges the language gap between client and service provider, providing equal access to services whilst ensuring clear and accurate communication.

What do you like about your role?

I like the constant interaction with customers and the rapport that I have built with many of our interpreters. I enjoy solving problems and the challenge of getting everything done in a day.

Where do you see yourself in 5 years’ time?

In 5 years’ time I want to be successfully qualified in level 3 business administration.

 

If you want to book an interpreter please email info@vlslanguages.com or call 01273 473986

 

 

                                                                                     

 

 

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Language knowledge at hand!

  • 14/10/2015
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  • Admin

We’re here to satisfy your hunger for knowledge. How do you think you did in our quiz about Language Curiosities? 

Here’s a reminder of the questions and the answers.  We hope you had fun thinking about them.

  Question 1. Approximately how many languages are spoken throughout the world?

  According to Ethnologue.com  there are 7102 living languages around the world. Ethnologue.com is a comprehensive source that catalogues all the known living   languages in the world.

  Question 2. In which country do they speak the most languages?

  The winner is Papua Nueva Guinea.  This small country in the south-western Pacific has a population of more than seven million people.  They speak 820 languages.  Why so many?  It’s because of the ‘orography’ of the country that many tribes were kept isolated, which allowed them to keep their own language.

Question 3. Which language is most widely spoken in the world?

Yes, you probably guessed it. The most widely spoken language in the world is Mandarin with more than 1000 million speakers. 

Question 4. Which are the most difficult and the easiest languages to learn?

The most difficult language to learn in the world is Euskera. It’s spoken in an autonomous community of northern Spain commonly called the Basque Country. The difficulty of this language comes from its structure. Its basic vocabulary goes through many changes, because of the vast number of prefixes, suffixes and infixes used, giving different meanings.   

The easiest language to learn in the world is Pirahã. This is the indigenous language of the isolated Pirahã tribe of the Amazon, Brazil. This language is only spoken by 150 people distributed in 8 different villages. This language does not have numbers, past tenses or colours.

Question 5. Which are the two oldest languages in the world, still in use today?

Chinese and Greek. Both languages have been spoken since 1500 B.C.

Question 6. Which language has the longest word in the world?

The longest word is found in English. The word has 189819 letters and is the name of a giant protein (Acetylseryltyrosylserylisoleucylthreon…) its abbreviation is “Titin”.

If you have three hours to spare, give it a watch...

 

 

 

Vandu Language Services is based in Lewes, Sussex and has been helping organisations overcome the language barrier since 1999. We provide interpreting, translation, bilingual advocacy and cross cultural training for when you need to communicate clearly across cultures.

                                                                                     

 

 

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