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Nowruz (Norooz)

  • 22/03/2016
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Nowruz (Norooz)

The next 13 days are called Nowruz, also known as Iranian New Year!

Celebrated worldwide for over 3,000 years it marks the beginning of Farvardin (The first month of the Solar Hijri calendar, the official calendar of Iran and Afghanistan), indicating the beginning of spring.

The word Nowruz blends together the Persian words “now” which means “new,” and “roz” which means “day.”

Nowruz celebrates renewal and rebirth, symbolised by the coming of spring. Now, it is also an important Iranian cultural holiday that spans many religious traditions. It is seen as a holiday for most celebrants and is enjoyed by people of different faiths, however it still remains a holy day for Zoroastrians (The ancient, pre-Islamic religion of Persia).

On the last Wednesday of the old year, the night of Chahar Shanbe Suri is celebrated in order to symbolically get rid of all the misfortunes and bad luck of the past year. People light small bonfires and jump over flames, shouting “Zardie man az to, sorkhie to az man,” which means, “May my sickly pallor be yours and your red glow be mine.”

Other traditions include a ceremonial table display called the “cloth of seven dishes”. This table remains in the family home for thirteen days after the start of the holiday. A traditional dinner for Nowruz is Sabzi Polo Mahi, a rice dish with whitefish and green herbs like parsley, coriander and chives.

 

7 traditional foods each symbolise an important aspect for the New Year:

 

Symbolising renewal:

Sabzeh: lentil, barley or wheat sprouts growing in a dish

Symbolising affluence:

Samanu: a thick, sweet pudding made from wheat germ

Symbolising love:

Senjed: dried fruit of the lotus tree

Symbolising medicine:

          Sir: garlic

Symbolising health and beauty:

Sib: apples

Symbolising sunrise:

Somaq: sumac berries

Symbolising age and patience:

Serkeh: vinegar

 

                                           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Left image shows a large feast that may be eaten around this period, right image shows people lighting a bonfire to get rid of any misfortunes and bad luck.                                                                     

Vandu Language Services is based in Lewes, Sussex and has been helping organisations overcome the language barrier since 1999. We provide interpreting, translation, bilingual advocacy and cross cultural training for when you need to communicate clearly across cultures.

                                                                                     

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What is Bilingual advocacy?

  • 01/03/2016
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  • Admin

Bilingual advocacy is a provisional service which helps individuals that do not speak English access the services they are entitled to and empowers them to take control of their own health and social care.

We are proud to say that there is a vast amount who have received this service and are now living empowered and fulfilling lives, without the need to rely on support services..

One particular case that saw an incredibly positive outcome was that of a couple who had been living in the UK for less than 6 months and were concerned about their 2 year old child’s health. They were told they had to have lived in the country for at least 6 months before registering with a GP. However, this information was false. We therefore assigned an Advocate to support the family. The advocate contacted the NHS on their behalf to ensure they received the healthcare they were entitled to.

The mother, who was pregnant at the time, was also able to receive support from a midwife with the help of the advocate.

Unlike interpreters, who are strictly impartial, an advocate can express the wishes and needs of the individual to ensure they are being treated fairly and receive the right care and support.

The main barrier for this family was language, so they were signposted to free English classes to help them develop and eventually find work.  They were also introduced to children’s centres who could provide childcare. From here the father soon found a job.

The advocate had given the family the support to find their independence and therefore  not have to lean on other services for support. The family have been guided onto the right track to develop freely.

Referrals for this service can come from anyone including a social worker, friend or relative. This simple step can transform someone’s quality of life.

This service has  such positive consequences for everyone involved. If you know of anyone you think would benefit from this service please get in touch so together we can make a difference.

To find out more about this service or to speak to an advisor, please contact the Vandu team on 01273 473986 or email admin@vlslanguages.com

 

Vandu Language Services is based in Lewes, Sussex and has been helping organisations overcome the language barrier since 1999. We provide interpreting, translation, bilingual advocacy and cross cultural training for when you need to communicate clearly across cultures.

                                                                                     

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Let’s take a step back in time

  • 24/02/2016
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  • Admin

Where it all began… We have been using the language industry for years!  The service that we are in all stems back to our roots. From as far back as we know people have needed to communicate to survive.

 

Translation is intertwined with that of language itself. The word translation stems from the Latin word ‘translatio’ which means ‘to bring or carry across’. As the world has developed this so has the formalisation of translation for business purposes, with the internet and mechanical translation revolutionising the field.

 

Here we have found some of the oldest types of correspondence in the world…

1. The first record we have of specific medical advice is in the form of an Egyptian papyrus. This document is 4,000 years old and is known as the ‘Kahun Gynaecological Papyrus’. It was discovered in 1889 and contains information on the diagnosis and treatment of a number of ailments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. Early literature often came in the form of poetry. Before writing, verbal stories were passed on through the generations and poetry was an easy way to learn and recite tales. ‘The Epic of Gilameshis a contender for the first poem. The earliest surviving written versions are dated to around 2000 BC.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Thought the oldest message in the bottle, ‘Chunosuke Matsuyama’ supposedly sent out a message in 1784, asking for rescue after he became shipwrecked. The message washed up on a beach in 1935.

 

 

4. The world’s first newspaper was launched in Germany in the early 1600s and was called Relation aller Fürnemmen und gedenckwürdigen Historien (Collection of all Distinguished and Commemorable News). The papers were published in Strasbourg, a Catholic city, so the protestant Relation was published anonymously to avoid given away the printing location.

 


5. The oldest correspondence ever sent were diplomatic letters between the pharaohs of Egypt and other political leaders. These clay tablets, known as the Amarna letters, were sent in the 14th century BC.

 

 

For more information on our translation services give us a call today on 01273 473986 or email translations@vlslanguages.com.

Vandu Language Services is based in Lewes, Sussex and has been helping organisations overcome the language barrier since 1999. We provide interpreting, translation, bilingual advocacy and cross cultural training for when you need to communicate clearly across cultures.

                                                                                     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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World mother language day

  • 17/02/2016
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  • Admin

The 21st of February 2016 marks 16 years since International Mother Language Day began, it has been observed every year since to promote linguistic cultural diversity and multilingualism.

The date represents the day in 1952 when students demonstrating for recognition of their language, Bangla, were shot and killed by police in Dhaka, the capital of what is now Bangladesh.

The term "Mother language" is used in several languages: lengua materna (Spanish), lingua madre (Italian) and langue maternelle (French).

On the 16th of May 2009, the United Nations General Assembly, in its resolution, called on its member states "to promote the preservation and protection of all languages used by people of the world". In the resolution, the General Assembly proclaimed 2008 as the International Year of Languages to promote unity in diversity and international understanding through multilingualism and multiculturalism.

The resolution was suggested by Rafiq Islam, a Bengali living in Vancouver, Canada. He wrote a letter to Mr. Kofi Anan, the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations asking him to take a step for saving all the languages of the world from the possibility of extinction and to declare an International Mother Language Day. Rafiq proposed the date as the 21st February, the day of the 1952 killing in Dhaka on the occasion of language movement.

Languages are the most powerful instruments for preserving and developing our heritage. All moves to promote the circulation of mother tongues will not only encourage linguistic diversity and multilingual education but also to develop fuller awareness of linguistic and cultural traditions throughout the world and to inspire solidarity based on understanding, tolerance and communication.

      

 

Vandu Language Services is based in Lewes, Sussex and has been helping organisations overcome the language barrier since 1999. We provide interpreting, translation, bilingual advocacy and cross cultural training for when you need to communicate clearly across cultures.

                                                                                     

                                  

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Roses are red violets are blue…

  • 12/02/2016
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  • Admin

Roses are red violets are blue…

Let’s explore some our favourite romantic destinations in the world for you…

 

Bali

 

With its exotic beaches and crystal clear sea, Bali definitely ticks every box for being a place to relax, unwind and enjoy the sun.

How to say ‘I love you’: Aku cinta kamu

 

New York City, USA

A stroll through central park is sure to get you feeling its magic whilst Times Square will dazzle you at night with its vibrant atmosphere.

How to say ‘I love you’: I love you!

 

Paris, France

A trip up the Eiffel tower or a stroll across Lock Bridge. This city break oozes romance, easily making it into our top 5.

How to say ‘I love you’: Je vous aime

 

Queensland, Australia


 

If you want to see some of the oceans finest, dangerous and most beautiful sea creatures, the Great Barrier Reef is for you. The vast golden beaches also attract many surfers and beach lovers.

 How to say ‘I love you’ in Australian aboriginal: Kungkungullun Ngune

 

Barcelona

 

Spain’s most popular tourist destination, Barcelona, has drawn crowds by the thousands for its unique charm. Fantastic architecture, interesting history, unforgettable sunsets and out of this world food.

How to say ‘I love you’: Te quiero

 

 

Vandu Language Services is based in Lewes, Sussex and has been helping organisations overcome the language barrier since 1999. We provide interpreting, translation, bilingual advocacy and cross cultural training for when you need to communicate clearly across cultures.

                                                                                     

 

 

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